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Most popular talk shows papers

June 29th, 2010 No comments

What do Jay Leno, David Letterman, and Oprah Winfrey have in common? They are the hosts of the most popular talk shows. I mostly watch David Letterman’s late show on CBS. There is a certain type of pattern in the show, and many other show hosts such as Craig Kilborn and Conan O’Brien are sharing this pattern. Although the Nielsen Media Research shows that the rating for such talk shows is not as high as other TV shows like Friends nowadays, I still want to make an in-depth analysis of talks shows because there is no such talk shows in the country I came from; therefore I think they represent the American culture in a certain way.

The requirements to be a talk show host are the ability of giving a good speech and sense of humor. David Letterman has them both. Hosts need these qualities to conduct the show, to bring enthusiasm and excitement. Can you imagine what would happen if a host has nothing else to say five minutes after the beginning of the show? Dave never has this kind of problem because he is wisely funny, talkative, and mean. He can make his monologue interesting. Dave always starts the show with about five short jokes. Many jokes are about current issues with celebrities. I personally hate people who make fun of the private lives of others, but I also understand that the subject would be attractive. After all, minding other people’s business and private life is the media’s main mission; it’s also part of the American culture. Actually I think it’s true for all cultures around the world. The fact that paparazzi chasing after Princess Diana and reporters hunting Monica Lewinsky says it all. Read more…

Madame DeFarge and Lucie Manette essay.

June 25th, 2010 No comments

The effect one person can have on another can change the fate of someones life. In the novel A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens use of this simple concept of influence highlights various elements such as characters, images, places, or conflicts. Madame DeFarge and Lucie Manette are two examples of two characters who opposite effects on people in this novel. Through the use of influence, Dickens emphasizes the different effects Madame DeFarge and Lucie Manette have on people.

Madame DeFarge shows the element of influence through her words and actions. Whether it is her husband or a group of strangers, she has quite a negative effect on the lives of others. Madame DeFarge is shown as bloodthirsty and eager for the French Revolution to take place as soon as possible. Mr. DeFarge in the beginning of the story is reluctant to the idea of taking away innocent lives. Madame is able to change the view of her husband to something of a more negative nature because of her strong character and dominant views on the revolution. Read more…

Kansas Memorial Union papers

June 18th, 2010 No comments

The Kansas Union was built as a living memorial to those Kansas alumni and students who gave their lives for our country in service during the Great War, or more commonly known as, World War I. More than three thousand Kansas students and alumni served in World War I, and sadly one woman and one hundred and twenty nine men were killed. What was meant to be a mere gift of gratitude towards the war veterans by alumni, students, faculty, and friends soon evolved into the living room of the university. Since the Kansas Union was completed in 1927, it has undergone several additions to keep up with the growing demands of the university.

The first suggestion for a student union building at Kansas was at a Student Council Resolution in 1911. A financial campaign followed this resolution resulting in the rental of a house at 1200 Tennessee (Cornerstone). However, since the building was so far away from campus, enthusiasm soon declined and it closed after only a year. Spurred by a 20 to 20 tie in football against Nebraska, a war memorial campaign emerged with a goal of a million dollars (Kansas Union). The funds were not only invested in the Union but also in building the Memorial Stadium, and a statue of “Uncle” Jimmy Green, which are another two very symbolic marks for KU. Alumni were reminded that one. Read more…

King Charles I

June 15th, 2010 No comments

On January 30, 1649 there occurred something that had never before happened in
the course of history, and this was a regicide. Regicide is when a king is put to trial and
sentenced to death by his own subjects. This happened for the first time in England to
King Charles I. Charles was a tyrant king from the beginning of his reign. Eventually
England grew sick of this tyrant king and Oliver Cromwell was the leader of the pack.
Charles attempted to terminate Parliament, but this was the straw that broke the camel’s
back, and now civil war was upon the people of England.

It seemed as though Charles I could do nothing right, but its not as though he
tried. Up until the end of the English Civil War there had been many disputes over
religious, political, economical and social matters. The English economy was crashing,
Charles did not bother taxing people. He instead began to sell common lands to
aristocrats. This enraged the peasants and middle class, making Charles many enemies.
The main reason for the selling of these lands was to fund an attack on the Scots. At this
time England’s army was almost nonexistent and there was little money to fund one. So
selling the common land was Charles’ only option in his mind. This did not sit well with
the people of England. Read more…

Revolutionary War papers

June 14th, 2010 No comments

When the Revolutionary War started, the colonists didn’t even think about declaring independence. They wanted to stay a part of their mother-land England. They just wanted to be thought of the same way in return. They wanted to be recognized in the eyes of the English Parliament. They even sent out a petition to the King of England asking for the blood shed to be stopped. The King refused to even read it and said that he wanted the colonies to be taken care of. This was the beginning of the colonies wanting to declare their independence from England.

The Congress of the America’s acted much like a regular government. They took command of the army and after King George declined their petition, their only choices were to either yield or fight. They appointed George Washington as the head of the Continental Army. Patrick Henry protested about how their rights as British citizens were being violated.

Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen took over Fort Ticonderoga. There they would gain all the supplies that the Americans found hard to find. They needed supplies because English ships weren’t selling them and infantry. They went up to the door and knocked and very nicely told them that they were being taken over. They didn’t use force or anything. After this little victory, they decided to go to Canada and see if they could take over the English up there. But this only showed the English that the Americans were not good on the offence. Read more…

Languages papers

June 8th, 2010 No comments

While it is the case that speakers of a single language control various styles and levels of the language, it is very common that people develop some knowledge and ability in a second language and so become a bilingual. A bilingual is a person who has some functional ability in a second language. In fact, a bilingual individual provides rich field for sociolinguistic study. The way a second language is acquired, as well as the domain or register in which it is used are regarded as important phenomena in which sociolinguistics is interested.

When talking about a bilingual person, it is important to know first the way each language is acquired; whether it is a mother tongue or a language being learned. In fact, this greatly affects the ability of using the language as well as the domains in which it is used. For example, concerning myself as a speaker and user of two languages, which are Arabic and English, the language I use is always according to the domain and function in which it is used. As for the Arabic language, which is my mother tongue, I always use it at home and in most of my daily activities because of my having a strong command of it and because of the society that I live in whose individuals are mostly native speakers of Arabic. On the other hand, I sometimes also use the English language, which I have learned as a result of having my whole education in English. Thus, I use the English language in an educational use, or when dealing with foreigners. Therefore, the use of the English language, which is a second language, which is a second language, is somehow limited, not like the use of the mother tongue. Read more…

Europeans integrated into North America

June 4th, 2010 No comments

As the Europeans integrated into North America, they also invaded the Native American’s territory. In doing this, some Europeans were arrogant and pompous, but others became friendly with them. Both the French and the British had interactions with the Native Americans. These included trading, being allies, and even going as far as intermarrying. At first, both societies got along with the Natives. It was not until the English started to move west and take the land for themselves that it became a problem with the Native Americans. Although they may have started out the same, being good friends and neighbors with the original inhabitants, the French and English in the New World developed two distinctly different relationships with them.

When the French came to the New World, they regarded the Natives as friends. Because of this friendship or understanding, it was possible for them to trade with one another. The French traders gave knives, beads, axes, hatchets, hoes, brightly colored cloths, mirrors, paints and other things of trifling value that appealed to the fancy of the Indians. The only things that the Indians had to sell or trade, and for which the French traders wanted to barter for, were the skins of furbearing animals. These included the beaver, otter, mink, muskrat, and several others found nearby that the Native Americans hunted. Read more…

Native American’s territory papers

June 2nd, 2010 No comments

As the Europeans integrated into North America, they also invaded the Native American’s territory. In doing this, some Europeans were arrogant and pompous, but others became friendly with them. Both the French and the British had interactions with the Native Americans. These included trading, being allies, and even going as far as intermarrying. At first, both societies got along with the Natives. It was not until the English started to move west and take the land for themselves that it became a problem with the Native Americans. Although they may have started out the same, being good friends and neighbors with the original inhabitants, the French and English in the New World developed two distinctly different relationships with them.

When the French came to the New World, they regarded the Natives as friends. Because of this friendship or understanding, it was possible for them to trade with one another. The French traders gave knives, beads, axes, hatchets, hoes, brightly colored cloths, mirrors, paints and other things of trifling value that appealed to the fancy of the Indians. The only things that the Indians had to sell or trade, and for which the French traders wanted to barter for, were the skins of furbearing animals. These included the beaver, otter, mink, muskrat, and several others found nearby that the Native Americans hunted. Read more…